Theatre Guild presents ‘The Crucible’ on Feb. 28

Denying+the+accusations+against+her%2C+Tituba%2C+played+by+Sophomore+Zoie+Eliacin%2C+pleads+her+innocence+from+charges+of+witchcraft+and+exclaims+her+love+for+God%2C+as+she+begs+for+mercy.++In+this+brutal+scene%2C+Eliacin+captivated+the+audience+with+the+incredible+emotion+in+her+lines.+%E2%80%9CI+felt+happy+that+I+could+express+myself+as+my+character%2C+Tituba%2C+and+that+I+could+be+dramatic+and+have+fun+with+friends%2C%E2%80%9D+Eliacin+said.+
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Theatre Guild presents ‘The Crucible’ on Feb. 28

Denying the accusations against her, Tituba, played by Sophomore Zoie Eliacin, pleads her innocence from charges of witchcraft and exclaims her love for God, as she begs for mercy.  In this brutal scene, Eliacin captivated the audience with the incredible emotion in her lines. “I felt happy that I could express myself as my character, Tituba, and that I could be dramatic and have fun with friends,” Eliacin said.

Denying the accusations against her, Tituba, played by Sophomore Zoie Eliacin, pleads her innocence from charges of witchcraft and exclaims her love for God, as she begs for mercy. In this brutal scene, Eliacin captivated the audience with the incredible emotion in her lines. “I felt happy that I could express myself as my character, Tituba, and that I could be dramatic and have fun with friends,” Eliacin said.

Ainsley Allen

Denying the accusations against her, Tituba, played by Sophomore Zoie Eliacin, pleads her innocence from charges of witchcraft and exclaims her love for God, as she begs for mercy. In this brutal scene, Eliacin captivated the audience with the incredible emotion in her lines. “I felt happy that I could express myself as my character, Tituba, and that I could be dramatic and have fun with friends,” Eliacin said.

Ainsley Allen

Ainsley Allen

Denying the accusations against her, Tituba, played by Sophomore Zoie Eliacin, pleads her innocence from charges of witchcraft and exclaims her love for God, as she begs for mercy. In this brutal scene, Eliacin captivated the audience with the incredible emotion in her lines. “I felt happy that I could express myself as my character, Tituba, and that I could be dramatic and have fun with friends,” Eliacin said.

Autumn Turpin, Editor

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On Feb. 28 and March 1 the Galileo High School Theatre Guild held its annual spring play, this season performing The Crucible.

“I’m very happy with how it went since a lot of family members and other people who do plays in the area came by and told us that we did well,” Theatre Guild Sponsor Glenn Weyler said. “ I have wanted to do this play since I was in middle school, but only very recently have I had enough people to pull off the production. When you take into consideration that this is a really heavy play with no dance numbers to cover things up, and the dialogue is very difficult, this is a really adult show and I think our kids did very well.”

Weyler has taught at Galileo since 2010 and has sponsored the guild since August of that year, directing 25 plays since including The Crucible.

“It took a while to put the production together,” Weyler said. “We cast the play in late August because I found as most clubs do that if you have 30 students show up to the first meeting with the interest of participating not as many will come to the next meeting or the next, so starting early whittles out the ones that are truly interested and casting gives incentive for them to show up.”

During first semester the cast met once a week, planning and perfecting character blocking and dialogue between characters.

“When we came back in January we went to two days a week in then we switched to three days a week and finally the last three weeks we practiced every day,” Weyler said of the schedule.

Two students served as stage crew for the play, which featured 22 student actors, many performing for the first time.

Senior Taylor Mangus played the role of Giles Corey for the production and has been in the guild since her freshman year.

“I enjoyed being in the play, it was kind of weird because it was my last year,” Mangus said. “Leaving Galileo and the theatre guild is bittersweet but I’m ready to graduate and start the next chapter of my life, and the theatre guild has helped get me there.”

For next year’s production, Weyler is planning to present, Into the Woods in collaboration with the Galileo Glee Club.

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