Students, faculty celebrate solar eclipse in style

Freshman+Emily+Larking%2C+Junior+Taylor+Mangus%2C+Senior+Nathan+Priddy%2C+Sophomore+Sehar+Bushra+and+Sophomore+Alaina+Berneche+watch+the+solar+eclipse+during+its+peak+at+the+fountain+in+downtown+Danville.
Freshman Emily Larking, Junior Taylor Mangus, Senior Nathan Priddy, Sophomore Sehar Bushra and Sophomore Alaina Berneche watch the solar eclipse during its peak at the fountain in downtown Danville.

Freshman Emily Larking, Junior Taylor Mangus, Senior Nathan Priddy, Sophomore Sehar Bushra and Sophomore Alaina Berneche watch the solar eclipse during its peak at the fountain in downtown Danville.

Photo contributed

Photo contributed

Freshman Emily Larking, Junior Taylor Mangus, Senior Nathan Priddy, Sophomore Sehar Bushra and Sophomore Alaina Berneche watch the solar eclipse during its peak at the fountain in downtown Danville.

Luke Garcia, Editor in Chief

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Two days ago, the stars aligned so that people from the United States could view a celestial phenomenon: a total solar eclipse.

According to the NASA Web site, “eclipses occur due to the special coincidence of the moon and the sun being the same angular size. The sun is 400 times wider than the moon, but it is also 400 times farther away, so they coincidentally appear to be the same size in our sky. This is what allows us the phenomenal beauty of the total solar eclipse.”

Science Teacher Lisa Coyne said she had been excited about the total eclipse since she had heard about over the summer.  She even held a trivia contest during Galileo’s Open House that aimed at informing students about the eclipse.

“I thoroughly enjoyed viewing the eclipse. I enjoyed using the NASA livestream as I viewed the eclipse here in Danville,” Coyne said. “I have seen two solar eclipses and one lunar eclipse. However, this was the first solar eclipse that I have ever viewed directly using eclipse glasses.”

The total eclipse was not viewable in Pittsylvania County, which lead many to travel to areas of the country where the totality could be seen. Two such people were Sophomore Mary McLaughlin and Senior Colin Steven who traveled to Cosby, Tenn. to view the totality.

“I started seeing things in the news maybe a month or two ago, but I didn’t really pay attention. I didn’t know much until the school started doing things about it,” McLaughlin said. “Seeing the moon move through the sun with the glasses must have been pretty cool but I bet it was nothing compared to seeing the total eclipse.”

While the eclipse might not have been as impressive in Danville as it was in Cosby, Danville residents were still able to view a partial eclipse that peaked at 93 percent sun coverage. Galileo even ordered special glasses for students to purchase for $1 so they could safely get a look at the eclipse take place.

“Planning for student engagement opportunities for the day of the eclipse began over the summer. We wanted to give the students a chance to experience this incredible event, but in a safe way,” Principal Michelle Ramsey said. “We ordered 325 pairs of glasses and originally planned to travel to the Carrington Pavilion as a school to view the eclipse. When it was decided that schools would dismiss early we decided to let the students take their glasses home instead. Viewing the eclipse gave them a chance at real active learning, witnessing something they had only read about up until this point.”

While the students went home to view the phenomenon the teachers and staff gathered in the parking lot for a team building professional development opportunity, viewing the eclipse from start to finish right outside the school doors.

“We are adopting the FISH! Philosophy this year and one of those principles is that we are serious about our work but also have fun doing it,” Ramsey said. “There are four principles and PLAY opportunities allow for the building of a positive school climate, something Galileo’s faculty does well.”

While many may have missed the opportunity to view this year’s total solar eclipse, another will be present in the US, Canada, and Mexico in 2024.  

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Students, faculty celebrate solar eclipse in style

    Showcase

  • Students, faculty celebrate solar eclipse in style

    Showcase

    Powder Puff raises more than $2,000 for local student

  • Students, faculty celebrate solar eclipse in style

    Showcase

    Students celebrate National Gear Up Week

  • Students, faculty celebrate solar eclipse in style

    Showcase

    Weathersby receives state championship ring

  • News

    Wildlife Center to visit Dec. 13

  • News

    Theater guild to perform ‘Gulliver’s Travels’

  • News

    ACE makes impressive showing at Cave Springs Invitational

  • Students, faculty celebrate solar eclipse in style

    Showcase

  • News

    Guild takes second place at regional competition

  • Students, faculty celebrate solar eclipse in style

    Showcase

    Powder Puff raises more than $2,000 for local student

Students, faculty celebrate solar eclipse in style